Applying DfE Guidance For Online Safety

Keeping children safe in education Statutory guidance for schools and colleges (September 2016)

Online safety

  • As schools and colleges increasingly work online it is essential that children are safeguarded from potentially harmful and inappropriate online material. As such CPS should ensure appropriate filters and appropriate monitoring systems are in place. Children should not be able to access harmful or inappropriate material from the school or colleges IT system. CPS should be confident that systems are in place that will identify children accessing or trying to access harmful and inappropriate content online.

  • As part of our safeguarding and or child protection we should have in place a clear policy on the use of mobile technology in the school.

     

Opportunities to teach safeguarding

  • CPS must ensure children are taught about safeguarding, including online, through teaching and learning opportunities, as part of providing a broad and balanced curriculum. This may include covering relevant issues through personal, social health and economic education (PSHE), and/or through sex and relationship education (SRE).

  • Whilst it is essential that CPS ensures that appropriate filters and monitoring systems are in place; it is recommended that we should be careful because “over blocking” does not lead to unreasonable restrictions as to what children can be taught with regards to online teaching and safeguarding.

     

Radicalisation

Radicalisation refers to the process by which a person comes to support terrorism and forms of extremism. There is no single way of identifying an individual who is likely to be susceptible to an extremist ideology. It can happen in many different ways and settings. Specific background factors may contribute to vulnerability which are often combined with specific influences such as family, friends or online, and with specific needs for which an extremist or terrorist group may appear to provide an answer. The internet and the use of social media in particular has become a major factor in the radicalisation of young people.

Child sexual exploitation and abuse

Child sexual exploitation is a form of sexual abuse where children are sexually exploited for money, power or status. It can involve violent, humiliating and degrading sexual assaults. In some cases, young people are persuaded or forced into exchanging sexual activity for money, drugs, gifts, affection or status. Consent cannot be given, even where a child may believe they are voluntarily engaging in sexual activity with the person who is exploiting them. Child sexual exploitation doesn't always involve physical contact and can happen online. A significant number of children who are victims of sexual exploitation go missing from home, care and education at some point.

 

 

Bullying

Emotional abuse: the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may involve conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children. These may include interactions that are beyond a child’s developmental capability as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another. It may involve serious bullying (including cyberbullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, although it may occur alone.

The Law

COPPA: It is illegal for any company to harvest personal information if there is someone under the age of 13 using the service.

Here are the age restrictions for holding an account, for some popular online websites/apps:

Facebook & Snapchat: +13

Whatsapp: +16

Youtube: +18

 

Site last updated 04.05.17
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